UKPN at the Arctic Frontiers 2020

The coming Sunday (January 26th) marks the beginning of the Arctic Frontiers 2020 The Power of Knowledge conference in Tromso, Norway. This will be an entire week of talks, plenary discussions, workshops, round tables, poster sessions and networking receptions.

The UKPN has three delegates this year actively engaging in various activities during the conference ranging from scientific talks to school outreach events with our colleagues from APECS Norway. 

We would also like to take this opportunity to advertise workshop that is particularly relevant to early career researchers working in the Arctic – Next generation Arctic field courses: sharing best practices from the UK, Norway and Russia.

  •  When: 29 January 2020, 16:15-17:45
  • Where: Mellomstort møterom (Quality Hotel Saga), Tromso
  • Organisers: UK Science and Innovation Network and NERC Arctic Office

For more details, please visit https://eu.eventscloud.com/website/614/side-events/

If you are attending, please come and say hi, you can find us by the UKPN poster, otherwise follow the #UKPN_ArcticFrontiers on Instagram to get a glimpse of one of the largest Arctic events of the year!

 

#UKinArctic #ArcticFrontiers #Arctic #Tromsø

Outreach webinar

Outreach webinar advert

 

It is now well-recognised that science outreach is an essential soft skill for any researcher. Do you understand the necessity but feel too underprepared to get involved? We’re offering online training for anybody interested in taking their science into the classroom and adding a polar theme. The training will be led by a science communication expert and a school teacher to allow both worlds to come together. The focuses will be science communication for children and activity preparation, with tips on public speaking.

Monday 17th February 10am – 12pm

Register here: http://tiny.cc/UKPN-webinar-registration

Happy Antarctica Day!

Happy Antarctica Day 2019!

Today the Antarctic Treaty is celebrating its 60th anniversary.

Every year since 2015 the UKPN have organised an outreach project – the Antarctica Day Flags Initiative – with the aim to spread the word about this success story for world-wide collaboration and to hope its message and values inspires future generations.

We asked participating schools to create a flag for Antarctica (as it is without an official flag) which they believe symbolises this continent. 

The flags are then sent to us here at UKPN, who pair flags from schools with researchers and station staff that are heading down to Antarctica for the Austral Summer (November-January). The flags are then transported all the way to Antarctica with these “flag bearers”, and proof of travel with a certificate and photos of their journey will be sent to the schools upon the flag bearers’ return.

For more information about our Antarctic Flags initiative, please visit: https://britishantarcticterritory.org.uk/blog-uk-polar-network-antarctic-flags/ or contact us at antarctica-day@polarnetwork.org

#AntarcticaDay2019_UKPN #PolarOutreach #AntarcticFlags

Seals of Antarctica

It is only two days left before the Antarctica day and today we want to share beautiful pictures of most amusing marine mammals by talented wildlife photographer Stas Zakharov: the Antarctica seals. There are 6 species of seals in Antarctica, including Antarctic Fur Seals, Leopard Seals, Ross Seals, Crabeater Seals and Weddell Seals, and these 6 species apparently make up the majority of all seals on earth. 

Weddell seals Leptonychotes weddellii at the Lemaire Channel

Antarctic fur seal Arctocephalus gazella, South Shetland Islands

Check out our Instagram;Twitter and Facebook for more posts and definitely check out @stas_zakharov_photo for more seals! 

The race to the pole – glance into history of Antarctic exploration

Today’s  post features history of exploration of the South Pole – fascinating and dramatic story of rivalry between the two expeditions.

“I am just going outside and I may be some time – he went out into the blizzard and we have not seen him since” From Scott’s diaries, 1912

Amundsen’s South Pole expedition. Image from: https://nationalpostcom.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/8-5_amundsens_group_at_pole_flag_flying1.jpg?quality=80&strip=all&w=780

Beginning of the 20th century was an era of polar exploration also known as Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration. One of the key figures in the world’s history of polar exploration undoubtedly is Roald Amundsen who first reached the South Pole by land in 1911 and also led the first expedition that first reached the North Pole by air in 1926 (on-board the airship Norge).  Amundsen and Oscar Wisting were the first men to have reached both geographical poles. But behind this simple date stands complicated and dramatic history of numerous attempts to be the first to reach the center of either hemispheres, history that carried away lives of many noble researchers, including Robert Falcon Scott’s entire party who died on their return journey from the South Pole where they found Norwegian flag deployed 34 days before Scott’s expedition arrival. The rivalry between British and Norwegian expeditions, led by Scott and Amundsen respectively, is perhaps one of the most dramatic events in the history of discoveries.

Read more about the race to the pole, details and differences between the two expeditions at: 

Antarctica wildlife photos

Today for  campaign we wanted to share some beautiful images of perhaps most iconic representatives of Antarctic fauna: penguins.

Stay tuned and follow us on Instagram;Twitter and Facebook for more posts, news and photos! 

Chinstrap penguin, Hope point, Antarctic peninsula. Photo credits Dmitry Frey

King penguins and RV Vavilov near South Georgia Island. Photo credits Dmitry Frey

Antarctic Treaty

Antarctica day: Antarctic Treaty

Map of Antarctica with the flags of the Antarctic Treaty nations. Photo from: https://www.bas.ac.uk

The Antarctic treaty is an international agreement that sets aside the entire Antarctica continent as a scientific preserve devoted to peace and science “forever to be used exclusively for peaceful purposes in the interest of mankind”. The treaty ensured freedom of scientific investigation and ban of military activities on the continent. It was the first nuclear-arms agreement and the first institution to govern all human activities in an international region with no sovereign jurisdiction. The treaty remains a unique and inspiring example of international collaboration and implementation of the common heritage of mankind principle. 

Signed on December 1, 1959 in Washington, D.C., United States it came into force in 1961 and currently has 54 member parties 29 of which, including all 12 original signatories to the treaty, have voting status (the latest status list as of April 2019 is available via the link). The twelve countries that were the original signatories are: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Chile, France, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States. All member parties implement the articles of the Treaty through their national laws. The Antarctic Treaty System holds yearly Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings (ATCM) and has an Antarctic Treaty Secretariat that facilitates and supports the ATCMs.

The treaty consists of 14 Articles and is available in English; French; Russian and Spanish.

Read more about the Treaty on the website of the British Antarctic Survey: https://www.bas.ac.uk/about/antarctica/the-antarctic-treaty/  

#AntarcticaDay2019_UKPN 

 

Antarctica Day 2019

Antarctica Day is celebrated on the 1st of December every year since 2010, when it was established to commemorate the signature of the Antarctic Treaty on 1st December 1959.

Antarctica Day was initiated by the Foundation for the Good Governance of International Spaces (www.ourspaces.org.uk) with aims of building global awareness of this landmark institution, and celebrating this milestone of peace in our civilization with hope and inspiration for future generations.

Flag of the Antarctic Treaty, source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/68/Flag_of_the_Antarctic_Treaty.svg/400px-Flag_of_the_Antarctic_Treaty.svg.png

Antarctica Day 2019 will mark the 60th anniversary of the Antarctic treaty. To celebrate this we launch the #AntarcticaDay2019_UKPN media campaign with a series of historic overview posts, photos and insights from current fieldwork in Antarctica.

Follow us on Instagram: @ukpolarnetwork;Twitter: @UKPolarNetwork and Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ukpolarnetwork/ for more updates! 

Writing Successful Proposals: a guide for ECRs

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Don’t miss our upcoming workshop!

Writing successful proposals

The UK Polar Network will be holding a workshop at the Arctic Sciences conference in Loughborough in September. We are offering an optional social media for conferences session on the evening of the 10th, a morning workshop on proposal writing, and a free lunch. Don’t forget to register before 8th August.

To register, click here 

For more information on the UK Arctic Science Conference, click here