Antarctic Treaty

Antarctica day: Antarctic Treaty

Map of Antarctica with the flags of the Antarctic Treaty nations. Photo from: https://www.bas.ac.uk

The Antarctic treaty is an international agreement that sets aside the entire Antarctica continent as a scientific preserve devoted to peace and science “forever to be used exclusively for peaceful purposes in the interest of mankind”. The treaty ensured freedom of scientific investigation and ban of military activities on the continent. It was the first nuclear-arms agreement and the first institution to govern all human activities in an international region with no sovereign jurisdiction. The treaty remains a unique and inspiring example of international collaboration and implementation of the common heritage of mankind principle. 

Signed on December 1, 1959 in Washington, D.C., United States it came into force in 1961 and currently has 54 member parties 29 of which, including all 12 original signatories to the treaty, have voting status (the latest status list as of April 2019 is available via the link). The twelve countries that were the original signatories are: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Chile, France, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States. All member parties implement the articles of the Treaty through their national laws. The Antarctic Treaty System holds yearly Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings (ATCM) and has an Antarctic Treaty Secretariat that facilitates and supports the ATCMs.

The treaty consists of 14 Articles and is available in English; French; Russian and Spanish.

Read more about the Treaty on the website of the British Antarctic Survey: https://www.bas.ac.uk/about/antarctica/the-antarctic-treaty/  

#AntarcticaDay2019_UKPN 

 

Antarctica Day 2019

Antarctica Day is celebrated on the 1st of December every year since 2010, when it was established to commemorate the signature of the Antarctic Treaty on 1st December 1959.

Antarctica Day was initiated by the Foundation for the Good Governance of International Spaces (www.ourspaces.org.uk) with aims of building global awareness of this landmark institution, and celebrating this milestone of peace in our civilization with hope and inspiration for future generations.

Flag of the Antarctic Treaty, source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/68/Flag_of_the_Antarctic_Treaty.svg/400px-Flag_of_the_Antarctic_Treaty.svg.png

Antarctica Day 2019 will mark the 60th anniversary of the Antarctic treaty. To celebrate this we launch the #AntarcticaDay2019_UKPN media campaign with a series of historic overview posts, photos and insights from current fieldwork in Antarctica.

Follow us on Instagram: @ukpolarnetwork;Twitter: @UKPolarNetwork and Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ukpolarnetwork/ for more updates! 

Writing Successful Proposals: a guide for ECRs

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Don’t miss our upcoming workshop!

Writing successful proposals

The UK Polar Network will be holding a workshop at the Arctic Sciences conference in Loughborough in September. We are offering an optional social media for conferences session on the evening of the 10th, a morning workshop on proposal writing, and a free lunch. Don’t forget to register before 8th August.

To register, click here 

For more information on the UK Arctic Science Conference, click here

UK-Russia science session at Arctic Science Summit Week

UK-Russia Arctic Scientific Cooperation: Towards a Better Understanding of the Changing Arctic
Time: Friday, 24 May, 14:00 – 15:30
Venue: Northern Arctic Federal University, Room 11220 (Academic Board Room, 2nd floor, Arkhangelsk, Russia
Organisers: UK Science and Innovation Network in Russia (SIN Russia) & the NERC Arctic Office

The UK and Russian science communities have long-standing research cooperation on climate change in the Arctic. Over the past two years this cooperation has been marked by exciting new developments: dynamic bilateral projects, workshops, conferences and initiatives, with a special focus on early career links and institutional partnerships. These scientific partnerships are helping to advance our understanding of the changing Arctic and the global implications of these changes: from northern forests and palaeoenvironmental studies to terrestrial and marine ecosystems, to adaptation of local communities. Join our session at Arctic Science Summit Week 2019 to learn more about recent UK-Russia scientific work and explore what further wider collaborative research opportunities might look like.

Co-Chairs
• Henry Burgess, Head of the NERC Arctic Office, IASC Vice-President
• Dr Marina Kalinina, Adviser to the Rector, Northern Arctic Federal University (NArFU), Arkhangelsk; Vice-President on Interregional Cooperation at the University of the Arctic

Speakers
• Prof. Mary Edwards, University of Southampton, UK-Siberia scientific working group (DIMA)
• Dr Marina Kalinina, Adviser to the Rector, Northern Arctic Federal University (NArFU), Arkhangelsk; Vice-President on Interregional Cooperation at the University of the Arctic
• Dr Rachael Turton, Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge
• Dr Olga Tutubalina, Faculty of Geography, Lomonosov Moscow State University
• Yulia Zaika, President of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists Russia (APECS Russia)
• Saule Akmetkaliyeva, UK Polar Network, Manchester Metropolitan University

Polar Software Workshop and Hackathon

Training the next generation of polar scientists in software sustainability

Organised in collaboration with the UK Polar Network and the Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM) UCL, more than 20 early career polar scientists were given the opportunity to improve their software skills during an interactive workshop. As with many scientific disciplines within polar sciences we have our software heroes with the opensouce code stored in github… and we have those who would never dream of sharing their code. There are, however, many who would like to fit into the first category and to be more open but are concerned about sharing their code. It was this group that we aimed to help, as well as those who would like to learn better practices in writing and developing their software.

The UCL Earth Sciences deinonychus ready to welcome participants to the workshop.

Several SSI fellows provided invaluable help on the day, not only through delivering their own sessions but also staying around and helping participants through the other practical sessions. Adam Jackson kicked off the day with an introduction to open science and sustainable software, and David Perez-Suarez and Yo Yehudi ran hugely successful workshops on testing and open scientific code through github respectively.

SSI Fellow Adam Jackson kicks off the day with an introduction to open science and sustainable software.

In addition to this training we had two speakers from industry who demonstrated that their software skills have transferred to careers outside of academia: Ruari Rhodes (Hiscox) spoke to us and Sam Thomas (Zopa) shared some of his wisdom from his previous work in academia. We were also fortunate enough to have an interlude from the coding from UCL’s Professor Chris Rapley who shared his extensive knowledge on climate change communication, setting us up nicely for the following day’s hackday.

Workshop particpants get to grip with David Perez-Suarez’s testing session.

The UK’s First Polar Hackathon?

Following the training workshop, many of the participants returned to participate in (as far as we are aware!) the UK’s first polar science hackathon. We were joined by participants from Airbus and other departments from UCL (physics and geography) to work on a variety of problems, including machine learning, shipping routes through the Arctic and extreme events in Greenland.

Projects were judged by popular vote, with a focus on open science, collaboration within the team, as well as results found during the day. Prizes for the hackathon were generously provided by Indorse.

A welcome pizza break from coding during the hackathon.

We will share results of this workshop with the international earth sciences community at December’s American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. We would like to thank the Software Sustainability Institute for providing funding for this workshop through my fellowship fund as well as the Association for Early Career Polar Scientists for additional travel support and endorse for sponsoring our Hackday. 
 
The resources from the workshop are available here: 
 
Adam Jackson (UCL)- Open science and sustainable software presentation source files
 
David Perez-Suarez (UCL)- Testing, Testing, One, Two… slides repository 
 
Ruari Rhodes (Hiscox)- Multi-lingual workflow and spatial data resources 
 
Yo Yehudi (InterMine, University of Cambridge)- Open Scientific Code using Git and GitHub materials slides 
 
Chris Rapley (UCL)- Climate Change- Delivering Value slides

UKPN and APECS Russia Present ARCTIS2019

Association of Polar Early Career Scientists in Russia (APECS Russia) and UK Polar Network together with Kola Science Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences invite you to attend an interdisciplinary field course in the Russian Arctic – “Arctic Interdisciplinary Studies – ARCTIS”.

 

ARCTIS will cover main domains of disciplines: Atmosphere, Cryosphere, Terrestrial, Marine and Social & Humanities.

 

The main goal of ARCTIS is to facilitate bilateral and interdisciplinary cooperation of early career scientists from the United Kingdom and Russia on Arctic natural and social studies. The course will be designed to create a fruitful and interactive platform to share ideas, exchange knowledge and gain new skills and experiences by developing collaborative science project concepts as a result of the meeting.

 

The field course will take place in Apatity, Kirovsk and Murmansk, Murmansk region, Russia.

 

To apply for the field course, click here.

 

Application deadline: 22nd November 2018

Notification of acceptance: 30th November 2018

ARCTIS Field Course: 18th – 22nd February 2019

 

ARCTIS2019_eng

(if you hover over the pdf below there are multiple pages to scroll through for more info!)

Opportunity to attend Marine Research and Education Conference in Moscow

Applications are invited from early career researchers (from PhD level to 10 years post-PhD) with an interest to marine stations to participate in a side-event during the Marine Research and Education Conference in Moscow, November 21-22, themed “Interdisciplinary marine research in the Arctic and Northern Atlantic Oceans”. The event is in collaboration with the UK Polar Network,  the Marine Research Center of Lomonosov Moscow State University, the UK Science & Innovation Network and NERC Arctic Office.
Screenshot from 2018-09-04 12-40-21
Workshops will be held at Moscow in the Institute of Oceanology with travel and accommodation support available. Please download the conference schedule and application form linked at the bottom of this post (to save the files you can right-click and print to PDF).

The application deadline is midnight (GMT) on 17th September2018 (i.e. 00:00 18/9/18 GMT). 

Please return completed application forms to to applications@polarnetwork.org for UK-based researchers or to info@maresedu.com for Russian-based researches with a title UK-Russian side-event.
Any additional enquiries can be addressed to the conference organising committee at info@maresedu.com

Software Workshop

  • Do you write any code?
  • Have you ever come back to your code from 6 months ago and had no idea why it doesn’t work any more (or what it even does)??
  • Does your code mysteriously stop working overnight even though you’re sure you didn’t change anything?
  • Do you ever wish you could get back your lovely code from last week that worked just fine before you changed it?
  • Do you use (or will you use) any kind of software in your research at all?
 

If you answer yes to any of the above then this workshop is for you!* We are holding a free day long workshop at UCL on September 18th on polar software which will cover everything from version control and writing better code to specific software used in polar research. We have a range of brilliant speakers from academia, as well as some who have taken the software skills they have learnt from academia into industry.

Apply here now! Limited help with travel costs are available. Registration is free, deadline is August 31st. If you’re not already convinced (and you really should be) there’s free lunch too 🙂

This workshop is for all early career polar researchers no matter your level of experience, masters, PhD and beyond and has been partially funded by the Software Sustainability Institute.

We also encourage participants to stay for our polar sciences hack day on September 19th– we will be joining with students from other disciplines (e.g. physics, computer sciences) to come along and work on some polar problems for a day so even if you don’t think you’re great at coding here is your chance to get some help from those who are, and put into practice the skills you learn during the workshop.

Any questions? Email Sammie Buzzard at s.buzzard@ucl.ac.uk